Barry and I have spent a lot of years in the IT sector, as executives, consultants, educators and imagineers. We, like you have seen the explosion in apps, the proliferation in information, and the frustration many individuals and corporations have with all of that.  Many of us feel like we've lost the handle on it and as a result spend most of the day looking for what we need, and trying to remember where we put it. 

 

We came to the realization that we have outgrown the methods we use to manage information and we need new ones.  The concept of inbox, for example came with the invention of the first writing desk in the 14th century. People received 3 letters a month then, not 300 an hour. File folders were invented during the civil war, for organizing hand written medical notes, no longer useful when 45,000 employees can create letters in seconds and drop them into SharePoint, or Dropbox or Google in nanoseconds.

 

The collective knowledge of teams and enterprises continues to be digitized and stored in many forms, documents, emails, web pages, events, blogs, CRM data, etc.. Typically this information is spread across multiple applications, repositories and the web.  As a result it becomes more difficult to find, discover and act on what we are looking for. Never mind even little things like correcting wrong information.  We need new computational tools to help organize, search, and understand these vast amounts of information. 

 

Right now, we work with information using two main tools—search and links. We type keywords into a search engine and find a set of documents related to them. We look at the documents in that set, possibly navigating to other linked documents.

 

While this is a powerful way of interacting with our online archive, apart from being tedious, something even more important is missing.  Imagine searching and exploring documents, emails, web pages, and other forms of information based on the connections, themes and associations that run through them.  Imagine automatically locating emails, social posts, contacts and other documents as associated sets, connected to people, events, communications and other related content items.

 

We built Bithoop to bring that capability to every user desktop and allow users to apply it directly to the information they work with daily.  It is a step beyond linking and searching, using a powerful association engine that organizes, prioritizes and connects the dots between disparate sets of information. 

 

Bithoop is a new computational tool.  It automatically, intelligently organizes, gathers, and associates cross platform/application information and delivers it to you. 

 

In short its your new cloud information desktop.  A control center that intelligently manages the information in multiple apps, archives and shared directories. 

 

Bithoop lets you continue to use the apps as the manipulation tools that they are, but allows you to interact with the information they contain in a fundamentally new way.

 

We think its the future of work.. Take bithoop for a spin, we think you'll like it a lot.

Raimund Wasner, CEO Founder

Raimund Wasner

Barry Baronas, Chief Architect, Co-Founder

 Barry Baronas, Chief Architect, Co-Founder